Showing posts with label boat. Show all posts
Showing posts with label boat. Show all posts

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Gino Macropodio & the Dead Lagoon

That Italian-Greek name is the needle that sews together a great read in this week's New Yorker.
While not stellar writing, there are some hysterical anecdotes that only an American son of privilege could acquire in the ratty waters of Venice.

Highlights:
• "Inmates were dangerously crazy women, not just moody ones."
• Rats, gun-runners ..."fighting certain taxi drivers for the city's cocaine trade .. "
• "Baby Fragola came in fast, blasting techno, holding the collar ..."
• "From the stomach, not the balls!"
• Macropodio "once rowed three miles across the lagoon with six friends to drink 40 bottles of wine. And then rowed back." (Fact checkers missed the math on this!)

Read "Open Water," the tale of "Kekquakea," by Sean Wilsey. Page 40 of the April 22 New Yorker.
More on the Venice pollution and water problems in this BBC article on a temporary Grand Canal boat ban.

Friday, September 7, 2012

Turkish Boat Sinks: 30 Refugee Kids Drown

On their way from near Izmir, Turkey, apparently headed to the Greek isle of Samos by night, 61 migrants with mostly Syrian, Iraqi and Palestinian passports drowned Thursday, according to an NBC story.
Half were children. The Turkish crew survived and was arrested.
Greece has complained for years that it cannot control its porous, coastal borders and that it is being used as a gateway to Europe. Greece also receives EU aide for illegal migrants.
The Onassis Foundation in New York hosted an amazing installation several years ago on this theme. The artist created whitewashed boats, shaped like giant pods containing beans, and suspended them over flowing water in the noisy Onassis atrium.
The New Yorkers pushed and drank and left. Do they remember?
The latest drownings are deja vu: see the book described in my post below on the David Kherdian family story, circa 1920.And of course, there is our family story, among countless others.
No transit, no safety, no identity, and no protector in authority. Is migrant and refugee desperation and suffering a fact of life in the world?